Bisexual men have higher risk of heart disease

From Medical Daily

The research team analyzed data on 7,731 male participants between the ages of 20 to 59. They were divided into four groups based on their sexual identities: gay men, heterosexual men, bisexual men, and heterosexual men who have sex with men.

The two objectives of the study were to examine heart disease diagnoses among men of different sexual orientations and also measure their modifiable risk factors for heart disease.

While no correlation was found between sexual identities and heart disease diagnoses, bisexual men were found to have higher rates of several risk factors for heart disease compared to heterosexual men. These included mental distress, obesity, elevated blood pressure, etc.

The other three groups were found to have similar heart disease risk. The only difference observed in health behavior was that gay men reported lower binge drinking than straight men.

“Our findings highlight the impact of sexual orientation, specifically sexual identity, on the cardiovascular health of men and suggest clinicians and public health practitioners should develop tailored screening and prevention to reduce heart disease risk in bisexual men,” said lead author Billy Caceres, an adjunct faculty member at Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York University.

Read the full article.

Gay men experience more depression and suicide

From Psychology Today

It’s well known to the point of stereotype that gay men experience higher rates of HIV, substance abuse, and suicide. But it’s less known, and hardly talked about, that we also have much higher rates of depression, especially those of us living with HIV, despite the causal relationship of depression and self-medicating and self-harming behavior.

You might call depression the big gray elephant in the room staring us in the face as we do our best to ignore it.

The 2013 fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual  (DSM) defines depression clinically as a depressive mood or loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities over a two-week period, along with four of these symptoms: “changes in appetite or weight, sleep, and psychomotor activity; decreased energy; feelings of worthlessness or guilt; difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions; or recurrent thoughts of death or suicidal ideation or suicide plans or attempts.”

Although depression affects both men and women, men kill themselves at rates four times higher than women. Of the 41,149 suicides in the U.S. in 2013, nearly 80 percent were men.

[…]

An American study of gay men found that those who perceived increased homophobia and danger were more likely to report depressive symptoms. Feeling unaccepted and rejected by the gay community—as do too many gay and bisexual men of color and those living with HIV—were also found to increase the risk for depression.

Read the full article.

Thousands gather Downtown as Pittsburgh shows its Pride

From the Pittsburgh Post Gazette

Members of the LGBTQ community and supporters came out in full force Sunday for the EQT Equality March and Pride Fest in Downtown Pittsburgh — events that celebrate gay rights.

This year’s parade had an attendance of tens of thousands. At one point, an announcement over the loudspeaker said this year’s parade was larger than the city’s St. Patrick’s Day festivities. It also was supported by a number of corporate sponsors and religious organizations.

Click here to go to the Post Gazette Video

“To see all these companies coming out and supporting us indicates there is more inclusiveness in the workplace,” said Craig Skvarka, 42, of Banksville. “There were a few [corporate sponsors] in years past. But there are more now.

The Pride march is an opportunity for people in the gay community to express their individuality. The streets were teeming with rainbow colors — representing the coming together of different sexual orientations — worn on capes, T-shirts and flags.

“It’s a way of expressing who we really are and allowing everyone to be comfortable in Untitled-3our own skin,” said Alayna Mott, 23, of Ambridge. “It means a lot to me because I am part of this community and I feel accepted by all around me.

See the video and read the article here.

A side-effect of preventing HIV with PrEP: Less condom use

As condom use falls, will other infections spread?

From NBC News online

A pill that protects people from the AIDS virus may be driving down use of condoms, Australian researchers reported Wednesday. They found that as more people used the daily pill, called PrEP, the less likely they were to use condoms.

It’s not clear what this means, the researchers wrote in the Lancet medical journal. But the fears are that availability of the pills could feed a false sense of security, and that dropping condom use will help fuel the already widening epidemics of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as syphilis and gonorrhea.

There are also fears that rates of new HIV infections could go back up if people stop using condoms and do not use PrEP consistently. But some activists said it’s a positive trend and will help remove the stigma surrounding gay and bisexual sex.

PrEP stands for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Researchers found that taking HIV drugs can protect people who are not infected from acquiring HIV. The most common brand name is Truvada, a once-a-day pill. This pill can prevent HIV. But use remains low.

PrEP can reduce the risk of catching HIV by 90 percent if people use it consistently. It’s been on the market since 2012 and has been recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since 2014.

“PrEP has been heralded as a game-changer for HIV, but declining condom use may impede its long-term population-level effectiveness,” Martin Holt at the University of New South Wales in Sydney said in a statement.

Holt and colleagues surveyed nearly 17,000 gay and bisexual men in Sydney and Melbourne between 2013 and 2017, before and after a large campaign to encourage PrEP use. By 2017, 24 percent of HIV-negative men were using PrEP, they found. Between 2013 and 2017, the consistent use of condoms fell from 46 percent of men in 2013 to 31 percent in 2017.

“A rapid increase in PrEP use by gay and bisexual men in Melbourne and Sydney was accompanied by an equally rapid decrease in consistent condom use,” Holt and colleagues wrote. Their findings fit with other research done, especially a 2016 study in San Francisco that found similar trend.

Read the full article.

The impact of sexual health on your mind, body, and spirit

From thebody.com

If you’ve googled “sexual health” recently, you know the only results are how to improve sexual performance. Well, you can’t improve anything until you know you’re educated on what you like and are being true to yourself. But what does that really mean?

Sexual health is the state of being mentally, physically and socially comfortable with your sexuality. Everyone’s definition of sexual health is personal, but here are a few universal tips anyone can practice (read the full article).