Pandemic sparks concerns about surging STD, HIV rates

The pandemic that has upended life in the U.S. could lead to increased STD rates and setbacks in the fight against HIV as public health resources are shifted to the coronavirus response.

Access to STD and HIV testing and treatment services are dwindling as local health departments shuffle staff to respond to COVID-19 and clinics reduce hours or close altogether and cancel outreach programs.

“We are seeing a complete disruption to STD prevention here in the United States,” said David Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD). “We expect to experience even higher STD rates as a result.”

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Second Open Letter on COVID-19 Focuses on Nondiscrimination, Data Collection and Economic Harm for LGBTQ Communities

From the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association

On April 21, 2020, GLMA, Whitman-Walker Health, the National LGBT Cancer Network, the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance, the New York Transgender Advocacy Group, and SAGE issued a second open letter to public health officials, healthcare institutions and government leaders on the impact of COVID-19 on LGBTQ communities. The letter, joined by 170 organizations, called for action to protect LGBTQ patients from discrimination and to include sexual orientation and gender identity in data collection efforts related to the pandemic. The letter also called for action to address the economic harm to LGBTQ communities from the pandemic.

To read the full second open letter and list of signatories, click here.

The letter released on April 21 is a follow-up to an open letter signed by more than 150 organizations issued by the six coordinating organizations on March 11, 2020. Information on the first letter is available here.

Important COVID-19 Resources:

What you need to know about managing HIV during the COVID-19 outbreak

From Parade.com

Decorative imageDuring the coronavirus pandemic, people with HIV fall into the “underlying conditions” group that may need to be more careful about their health. As states give shelter-in-place orders and move through the toughest weeks ahead in the outbreak, those with HIV should take a few extra precautions to plan ahead and remain safe.

Overall, people with HIV should know that they aren’t more likely to contract COVID-19 than others, the World Health Organization says. At this time, it is unknown whether those with HIV face a greater risk of infection or more serious complications.

“While there’s not yet a lot of evidence here, COVID-19 does not appear to affect people with HIV differently than other people,” says Stephen Lee, executive director of NASTAD, formerly known as the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors.

Until more data from the cases in China and the U.S. can be analyzed, those living with HIV should be “extra vigilant,” he says, especially those who have advanced HIV, are older, or have poorly controlled HIV. Those with additional chronic diseases, such as diabetes or heart or lung disease, should be careful as well.

“Stay home as much as you can, keep a safe distance, and wash your hands often,” Lee says.

[…]

Researchers haven’t been able to study much about the correlations between HIV and COVID-19. At the same time, those living with HIV should follow CDC guidelines for those with underlying health conditions, says Jonathan Mermin, director of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention.

Read the full article on Parade.com.

How does COVID-19 impact LGBTQ2 communities?

From Xtra.com

As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens the health of people and of economies worldwide, many in the global LGBTQ2 decorative imagecommunity sense a particular vulnerability to the pandemic’s immediate and downstream effects. In response, many are coordinating efforts to care for their own communities, often modeling their strategies on lessons learned from HIV/AIDS advocacy.

“One of the things I’m very concerned about is the social safety net,” says Charles Stephens, the director of The Counter Narrative Project, a Black gay men’s advocacy organization based in Atlanta, Georgia. Indeed, systematic employment discrimination could make the potential economic and health-related fallout of COVID-19 a greater threat to queer communities.

 

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