HRC is mailing sex positive kits as part of its “My Body” HIV campaign to celebrate Black and Latino LGBT people

From Poz.com

“Embrace your body and your sexuality. Taking precautions against HIV doesn’t mean you should be ashamed of your sexuality or not enjoy sex—you can love your body and stay safe.”

Find out how you can get your box of goodies…

That’s the opening message of “My Body,” a new HIV awareness and education campaign by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), a national LGBT advocacy group. Recognizing that nearly a quarter of young queer adults lack proper evidence-based sex education about HIV, the campaign is geared to empowering Black and Latino LGBT people between ages 16 and 35.

You can learn more about the boxes in the video and request one at HRC.im/MyBody.

Read the full article on Poz.com.

Latino Gay/Bi men’s health rally to focus on U=U during COVID-19

From Poz.com

Spearheaded by the Hispanic Health Network, this year’s rally includes two panel discussions. “HIV Stigma and COVID-19” takes place at 1 p.m. ET Monday, November 9. According to the rally’s website, “panelists will share and discuss information about the importance of U=U in the times of COVID-19, how U=U is used to combat stigma and barriers to reach an undetectable viral load. They will also discuss how COVID-19 has impacted Latinx Gay/Bi Men’s Communities and HIV-related stigma connected to U=U. During this panel, speakers will explore the role of religion to interrupt stigma.”

U=U stands for Undetectable Equals Untransmittable, which refers to the fact that people living with HIV who maintain a suppressed viral load cannot transmit HIV via sex, even when condoms are not used.

The second virtual panel, “Strengthening of the Latinx Gay/Bi Men’s Communities,” is scheduled for 1 p.m. ET, Tuesday, November 10. “The panelists will discuss racism colorism, machismo and heteronormativity in Hispanic/Latinx communities,” according to the website. “Panelists will also touch upon how to address these issues through diversity acceptance. Panelists will talk about the impact of Black Lives Matter on the Hispanic/Latinx communities and the importance of developing leadership to strengthen communities for a healthier future.”

You can register for both events and read speaker bios on the Rally 2020 site.

9 FAQs for when your partner has HIV

From Everyday Health

If you’re in a new relationship with someone who has HIV or you’ve recently found out that your longtime partner is HIV positive, you may be experiencing a whirlwind of emotions — possibly fear, sadness, or even anger, depending on the context. You may be concerned that you’ll get HIV from your partner or wonder how being with an HIV-positive person will affect your relationship or daily life.

As you begin to emotionally adjust to your situation, it’s important to get the facts about being with a partner who has HIV. Certain fears about having an HIV-positive partner may be outdated, but there may also be precautions you weren’t aware of that you could take to avoid HIV

Here are some questions you may have if your partner has HIV, and answers from leading experts on the virus.

The 2021 Health Insurance Marketplace® is open for business!

Cross-posted from Healthcare.gov blog

You have until December 15 to apply for new 2021 health insurance, or renew, change, or update your 2020 health plan for 2021. Coverage starts January 1, 2021.

Important: If you miss the deadline, the only way you’ll be eligible to enroll in or change your health plan for 2021 is if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.

How to start or update an application online

  • If you’re new to HealthCare.gov, create an account.
  • If you already have an account, just log in to start or update an application.
  • If you have questions or need help with your application, you can connect with someone on the phone. Call Center Representatives are available most days (except certain holidays) to support your enrollment needs.

See other ways to apply.

Meet the queer artists changing the way we think about owning our sexual health

From Queerty.com

So it’s no surprise that James, like thousands of others, has turned to OraQuick’s in-home HIV test as a key part of their sexual health toolkit. James Falciano is a champion of their queer community, something that is reflected in their art, activism, and everyday life.

It’s the simplest way to get accurate, fast results without waiting in line at the clinic or doctor’s office – if you can even get one these days. In as little as 20 minutes, in the privacy of your own home, you obtain your results, along with access to 24/7 support.

It’s the way to take control of your own sexual health and to own your own sex life.

James and two other fabulous queer artists, Preston Nelson and Kitsch Harris, are partnering with OraQuick to encourage HIV self-testing.

Here are samples of their art to explore along with conversations about their work (and read more at Queerty.com).

  • James Falciano