PrEP for beginners: What to know about the HIV-preventive drugs

From mensvariety.com

Truvada was the original PrEP drug. All of the trials and data about PrEP that you can find right now are about Truvada. It’s the tried and true option. Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration approved a second drug in 2019 from Gilead Sciences. As clinic trials showed, this second drug, called Descovy, is less toxic to the kidneys and bones than Truvada. That’s not to say that Truvada is toxic, but that the drug can possibly cause kidney problems or bone mineral density problems later on. As such, PrEP users have celebrated the arrival of Descovy. On top of that, it is MORE effective in preventing HIV. But, of course, it’s more expensive too.

Are you considering getting PrEP but need to know more basic info before you take the plunge? Are you concerned about your safe sex measures and want to know your options in protecting yourself from STIs like HIV? We decided it would be a good idea to write up a “basics” post and general guide for anyone wanting to know more about the HIV-preventive drug. If that sounds interesting to you, keep reading

One size doesn’t fit all when it comes to products for preventing HIV from anal sex

From medicalXpresss.com

Conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Microbicide Trials Network (MTN), DESIRE focused on potential delivery methods for rectal microbicides—topical products being developed and tested to reduce a person’s risk of acquiring HIV and other sexually transmitted infections from anal sex. MTN researchers are particularly interested in on-demand options—used around the time of sex—and behaviorally congruent options that deliver anti-HIV drugs via products people may already be using as part of their sex routine.

“DESIRE stands out as a unique study because we took a step back and said, ‘Let’s figure out the modality without automatically pairing it with a drug’,” explained José A. Bauermeister, Ph.D., M.P.H., study protocol chair and Albert M. Greenfield Professor of Human Relations at the University of Pennsylvania. “It gave us the ability to manipulate the delivery method without having to worry about how reactions to a particular drug might confound the results. We also had people trying out these methods in their own lives, and only then asked them to weigh the attributes of each.” As such, he said, participants weren’t making choices based on theoretical concepts, but instead using real experiences to guide their preferences.

Read the full article.