Studies firmly establish “undetectable equals untransmittable”

From NIH.gov

Extensive evidence from HIV prevention research studies has firmly established that “Undetectable Equals Untransmittable,” or U=U. This means that people living with HIV who achieve and maintain an undetectable viral load — the amount of virus in their blood — by taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) as prescribed do not sexually transmit HIV to others. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates this strategy is 100% effective against the sexual transmission of HIV.

Now, a new study of nearly 112,000 men who have sex with men in the United States has found increasing acceptance of the U=U message in this population. Overall, 54% of HIV-negative participants and 84% of participants with HIV correctly identified U=U as accurate. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. Study results were published online in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

“U=U has been validated repeatedly by numerous studies as a safe and effective means of preventing the sexual transmission of HIV,” said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., NIAID Director. “The increased understanding and acceptance of U=U is encouraging because HIV treatment as prevention is a foundation of efforts to end the epidemic in the United States and around the world. This public health message has the power to reduce stigma, protect the health of people living with HIV and prevent sexual transmission of HIV to others.”

Read the full article.

Health Alert: Get tested for HIV and other STIs

According to a CDC report, HIV continues to have a disproportionate impact on racial and ethnic minorities, gay and bisexual men, and other men who have sex with men. Yet, 15% of men who are infected with HIV don’t know it.
Also, according to CDC research, cases of gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis have risen for the fifth consecutive year.

Some STIs (including HIV) can go unnoticed since symptoms can be mistaken for minor health problems like a cold or sore throat. Some may have no symptoms at all. The only way to know if you’re infected is to get tested.

If you send us your zip code, we can help find local testing near you. Most are free. You can also ask us questions about basic sexual health, including PrEP. Send a message to m4mInformation@pitt.edu. We’re here to help

 

A new campaign is calling for butt selfies

From hivplusmag.com…
By Zachary Zane

It shouldn’t be that hard to find a health care professional who’s up-to-date and sensitive to specific needs of the LGBTQ and HIV-positive communities. Yet, for many, it still is.

In some smaller suburbs, it’s nearly impossible to find a doctor who is knowledgeable about issues like PrEP, hormone replacement therapy, anal pap smears, and other queer health care requirements. In fact, most people living with HIV have to specifically see an infectious disease specialist when, in theory, their primary care physician should know how to help them achieve and sustain an undetectable viral load.

These days, HIV is a manageable condition, similar to diabetes. It shouldn’t be the responsibility of HIV-positive and/or queer people to find a doctor adept at treating them. That’s why the #WeNeedAButton campaign is putting the responsibility on doctor-patient matching sites.

I’ve teamed up with DatingPositives.com, a dating site for poz people, and Waxoh.com, its sex-positive digital magazine, to promote the effort. DatingPositives.com embraces those managing all STIs and takes their issues very seriously. Given that the LGBTQ community often overlaps with this community, the partnership was a perfect match — so to speak.

Together, we have a mission to improve our community’s health care experience and minimize stigmatization. Our simple solution? A single button to identify queer-friendly doctors.

Read the full article.

Latino and Black men less likely to use PrEP

Research says that men who have sex with other men make up 67% of new HIV infections. Then on top of that, 25 percent of Latino men who have sex with other men (MSM) will be infected with HIV in their lifetime. And, 50 percent of Black MSM will experience the same. That’s compared to 12.5 percent of white men. That said, men of color are less likely to use the HIV preventive drug pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. Why is this?

A recently published study in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report tries to understand why this is happening. The study, led by Dafna Kanny of the CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDs Prevention looked through interviews with 4,000 men who took part in a 2017 HIV Behavioral Surveillance Survey.

As NBC writes, researchers believe the problem lies in accessibility issues to health care. Studies show health care providers are not prescribing Black and Latino men to PrEP. In addition, men of color are less aware of PrEP’s very existence. The CDC’s study found that 95% of white men, 87% of Latino men, and 43% of Black men are knowledgeable about PrEP. Then even worse, only 58% of white, 44% of Latino, and 43% of Black men said they discussed the preventative medication with a physician.

As Kanny told Reuters Health,“This type of research is critical to finding—and correcting — missed opportunities to offer PrEP to people at risk of HIV, particularly among African American and Latin gay and bisexual men.”

He said further: “It’s important for providers to take sexual histories of gay and bisexual men and to discuss PrEP as an option for HIV prevention with those who could potentially benefit from it,” said Kanny. “These discussions also help to destigmatize PrEP use, which is particularly important for increasing PrEP use among African American and bisexual men.”

Care providers reluctant to explain *undetectable equals untransmittable* to patients

From Medscape

WASHINGTON, DC — HIV treatment that leads to viral suppression for at least 6 months is 100% effective in preventing the transmission of HIV, even in the absence of condoms or HIV prevention drugs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But not all care providers tell their patients that.

A survey in the Midwest showed that 22% of HIV physicians still don’t feel comfortable explaining to patients the science behind what is known in the community as U=U, or undetectable equals untransmittable.

And that number is even higher among the physician assistants, nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, and traditional registered nurses who serve people living with HIV, said Emily Petran, MPH, from the Minnesota site of the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center (MATEC) in Minneapolis.

The survey — which was more of a needs assessment than a scientific survey — points to the need for education so that people with HIV have all the information they need to care for themselves and their partners, she said here at the United States Conference on AIDS 2019.

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Use of HIV prevention pill rising among men who have sex with men

From Reuters Health

A growing proportion of American men who have sex with men know they can take a daily pill to avoid infection with HIV and more of them are using it, a U.S. study suggests.

So-called HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly protective against the virus that causes AIDS, but many people worldwide don’t get this pill because they aren’t aware of it, don’t think they need it, or because it’s unavailable or unaffordable. Efforts to raise awareness among one high-risk group – men who have sex with men – have been complicated because some of these men don’t identify as gay or bisexual and mistakenly think heterosexual people don’t need PrEP.

In 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched an effort to get PrEP to all men who have sex with men who might benefit from the pill, not just gay and bisexual individuals. The current study looked at national health survey data to track changes in awareness and use of PrEP from 2014 to 2017 in 20 American cities.

Overall, there was “a significant increase in the percentage of gay and bisexual men at high risk for HIV who are using PrEP,” said Teresa Finlayson, lead author of the study and a researcher at the CDC in Atlanta.

Read the full article.